The Reality of Doing Blog


Inside the Room (part 6)
May 21, 2009, 5:26 pm
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Inside the Room (Part 5)
May 20, 2009, 3:58 am
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Inside the Room (Part 4)
May 18, 2009, 7:13 am
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Inside the Room (part 3)
May 14, 2009, 8:55 am
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Inside the Room (part 2)
May 12, 2009, 5:59 pm
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**(The following posts come from my experience during the last few weeks working as an intern in a busy casting office. While some of the stories/observations will be based on the particulars of the office itself – I feel there are many, many, many take away points from which any actor can benefit.)

  • General mailed submissions are a waste of money.

  • If you are going to mail – plain envelopes are just fine. You don’t have to use expensive mailing supplies or services.

  • Do your research, and submit to the appropriate office.
  • Write the character name and episode number on the outside of the envelope to let whoever is opening the mail know that it is an actual submission.
  • Use a post-it, or write the character name on the headshot itself.
  • Consider organizing a drop-off co-op with some friends. Find out which friends live in different areas around town and exchange headshots.
  • GET CREATIVE!




Star Trek = tears? WTF
May 8, 2009, 1:36 pm
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So we just saw Star Trek, and I was moved to tears. Surprised me too. Not exactly the reaction I was expecting. (I know I’m a pretty emotional guy, but seriously?) So I rode out the wave and stepped back to see what it was about the experience that effected me so deeply.

Despite the mindblowing special effects, tremendous acting and just all around excellent filmmaking – at the end of the day you’ve got a story that’s ultimately about love. A parents love for their child, a mans love for his home, the brotherly love of friendship, etc. It’s a story about building a “family.” Arguably one of the most iconic families in pop culture history. (TNG was more my time, but I saw many of the originals in syndication.)

And as we sat through the credits I realized that this same story of family could be told by looking at the team of individuals who made this film – an equally iconic family of above and below the line players. I admit that I have been a J.J. Abrams fanboy since the days of Felicity, and most outspokenly since Alias. And with each new project I admire his loyalty to family.

And what I know and feel so deeply is that that’s the kind of artistic and creative family that I want to be a part of. I want to work with other highly-motivated, creative, artistic, passionate people who want to tell great stories with excellence.

Thanks J.J. for an amazing ride with Star Trek, but thank you even more for being an example of the kind of family that Hollywood can be.

(Note to self: Now wipe your nose and get back to work!)




Inside the Room (part 1)
May 6, 2009, 1:36 pm
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**(The following posts come from my experience during the last few weeks working as an intern in a busy casting office. While some of the stories/observations will be based on the particulars of the office itself – I feel there are many, many, many take away points from which any actor can benefit.)

First up – Mailed Submission: RESUMES

FACT: Headshots are 8×10.
FACT: Standard size paper is 8.5×11.
FACT: These two items are not the same size.

You can fight it, think it’s unfair, refuse to succumb to the standardization of submissions and march to the beat of your own drummer; and I will be the first to applaud artistic individualism, but in this case – it’s KILLING YOU.

Just TRIM the paper. It doesn’t have to be expensive linen resume paper, fancy cardstock or PaperDirect’s finest – but it does have to fit on the back of your picture. That simple. If it doesn’t, it goes in the trash. (Seriously.)

Next: ATTACH the resume to your headshot. It doesn’t matter how you do it. Four staples, two staples, gluestick, double-sided tape, homemade paste. Whatever your pleasure. Just stick the two together! (paperclips don’t count)

In this particular office, any headshot to which the resume was not attached – IMMEDIATELY gets put in the trash. So think about it, you’ve spent however much on postage (a topic to be covered in a later post) only to have your picture pitched before it can even cross the Casting Directors path. What a waste.

There are so many things that actors do to take ourselves out of the running even before the door of opportunity cracks open. I know this may sound harsh, but there were a couple of pictures that came in the mail that I thought, “hey, this guy is so [show].” only to find the resume not attached to the headshot and then promptly filed in the circular file.

Of the hardcopy submissions that the office received last week, a MAJORITY of them were thrown out for this (or other reasons to be discussed later). By taking small, simple steps – you dramatically increase your chance of looking professional. (And if you’re going to ask a production to pay you almost $800 a day – show them that you are the professional that they need to hire.)

There are SO MANY aspects of the casting process that the actor has NO control over. Trimming and attaching your resume to your hardcopy submission is one that you can completely control. Do this. Please. I don’t want to throw out your picture next week.